Therapies

Luxury Addiction Treatment

Check out our Therapeutic services

Our San Diego evidence-based services are an integral part of the recovery process. Each client is provided with four individual holistic healing sessions per week and has the opportunity to choose from an array of holistic addiction treatment services.

If you or a loved one is suffering from addiction and would like more information on how these therapeutic offerings at our California holistic rehab in San Diego can benefit your recovery, please get in touch with our Admissions today.

Same day admission is possible along with treatment programs to meet individual needs including our luxury rehabnon-12 Step rehab,executive rehab and San Diego detox.

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  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

     

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is one of the Non-12 Step treatments utilized by the highly credentialed staff at AToN Center. The term “cognitive” refers to one’s thoughts – meaning that CBT focuses on changing thoughts, which may decrease emotional distress. When emotional distress is decreased, behaviors can also be changed. This goal-oriented therapy focuses on teaching residents how to analyze their thought processes. It allows the resident to identify if these thoughts are helpful or distracting to recovery.

    CBT draws awareness to automatic thoughts entrenched in one’s core beliefs. Core beliefs influence how one views the world and determine automatic thoughts triggered by daily life experiences. These thoughts and beliefs may be distorted, and residents work with the clinical team to enable the resident to work on strategies and skills – to develop more realistic, rational, and positive thoughts. CBT is a powerful and evidence-based tool for treating substance misuse disorders, as the American Psychological Association recommended.

    At AToN Center, residents learn the common “cognitive distortions” and apply them to their unique circumstances. They also have assistance in identifying more rational and healthy ways of thinking about their experiences. Residents learn how to complete thought records, which are an essential tool in mastering CBT. Residents also learn other techniques that often provide relief, such as the double standard technique, thinking in shades of grey, survey, experimental, and others.

    Together, the clinical team and resident create and train practical coping mechanisms and skills to use in real-time to prevent relapse. AToN Center combines CBT, Relapse Prevention, and Assertiveness Training to give our residents the optimal tools to set them up for success. Residents can practice these skills during weekly exposure sessions. Once the resident has been discharged from AToN Center, they can access the CBT skills they learned throughout their lifetime.

  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy

  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

     

    Dialectical behavior therapy is a type of behavioral therapy that combines two opposing ideas or forces: acceptance and change. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) aims to help people learn how to accept themselves as they are. While also working to change the negative aspects of their lives. DBT has been shown to be effective in treating a variety of mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and substance abuse. The goal of DBT is to help people develop the skills they need to cope with difficult emotions and situations.

    The four main goals of DBT are to reduce the frequency and intensity of therapeutic sessions; improve functioning in key areas of life; improve overall quality of life; and reduce suicide rates. DBT therapists use a variety of techniques to help people achieve these goals. These techniques include mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance.

    DBT was first developed in the 1980s by Dr. Marsha Linehan. The goal of the therapy was to help people with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) better cope with their emotions and impulsive behaviors. However, DBT has since been shown to be an effective treatment for a variety of other conditions, including substance abuse and eating disorders.

    The therapy is based on the principle that all humans have the ability to change and grow. This means that even when someone is feeling hopeless and helpless, they can still find ways to improve their situation. DBT aims to help people learn how to effectively regulate their emotions, control impulsive behaviors, and build healthier relationships with others. While it is not a cure-all, DBT has helped many people to improve their lives in a meaningful way.

  • Acceptance & Commitment Therapy

  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

     

    Substance use disorder (SUD) is a broad term that refers to a person’s inability to control their use of an illegal or legal drug or substance. An individual may initially start using drugs due to curiosity, to feel good, or relieve stress. However, over time, they may develop an addiction, defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite the harmful consequences. Individuals with an addiction often continue using drugs despite the negative impact on their health, relationships, and job.

    In fact, addiction is considered a relapsing disease because it is often characterized by periods of remission and relapse. Although there is no cure for addiction, it is treatable. With evidence-based treatment, individuals can learn to manage their disorder and live healthy, productive lives.

    Fortunately, there are effective treatments for SUD, including medication and therapy. One therapeutic approach for SUD that has been emerging over the past couple of decades is acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). ACT is a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy that focuses on helping people change their relationship to their thoughts and emotions. rather than trying to control or eliminate them.

    The goal of ACT is to help people live in the present moment and make value-based choices, even in the face of difficult thoughts and emotions. Research has shown that ACT can be effective in treating SUD, as well as other mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression. If you or someone you know is struggling with SUD, consider seeking out a therapist who specializes in ACT.

  • EMDR

  • EMDR Therapy

     

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapeutic intervention often utilized in trauma treatment. Specifically, EMDR assists residents in appropriately processing prior traumatic experiences that have continued lingering effects. Many individuals who abuse substances have had traumatic events occur that have not been processed, which may fuel their addiction. It is not uncommon for individuals to self-medicate to cope with the trauma. When someone has had an acute traumatic event, there is a negative impact on the person’s sense of self. Because of the disturbing nature of the experience, the brain’s information processing system has been interrupted, essentially creating an unprocessed memory that can emerge as if the trauma is happening again.

    According to Dr. Francine Shapiro – the pioneer of EMDR: “The hypothesis is that the procedural elements of EMDR . . . trigger a physiological state that facilitates information processing.” This information processing is believed to facilitate an “adaptive resolution,” meaning that prior trauma has been appropriately processed and is no longer disturbing to the resident. Using EMDR therapy, the resident can address the traumatic experience(s) in a safe, therapeutic environment. By releasing the trauma, the resident can learn about the experience and move forward in their lives.

    AToN has trained therapists with years of experience in treating trauma through EMDR. EMDR can be used with other modalities to help the resident with their trauma and co-occurring symptoms. Residents often report a great deal of relief even after just one EMDR session.

  • Trauma Treatment

  • Trauma-informed Care

     

    At AToN Center, ninety-eight percent of our residents are diagnosed with both a substance use diagnosis and some form of mental health diagnosis. The most common diagnoses comorbid with substance use at AToN are depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. As traumatic experiences are often related to these diagnoses, AToN has a vigorous trauma treatment program.

    AToN Center has four full time psychologists who are at least EMDRIA Level 2 trained in Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR). Residents who are clinically appropriate and who desire to participate in EMDR will typically begin this therapy around the 10-14 day mark of their treatment. Depending on each case, a resident may participate in up to three ninety – minute EMDR sessions per week at AToN Center – however some residents may prefer less intensive treatment, and requests are certainly honored!

    While some residents may not be clinically appropriate for EMDR, but desire this treatment, our clinicians will assist our residents in developing the coping strategies necessary to prepare for this intense therapy and refer our residents to continue this process on an outpatient basis. These coping strategies include biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy skills.

  • Mindfulness Practices

  • Mindfulness Practices

     

    Mindfulness is a state of being present in the moment without judgment. It is about being aware of your thoughts, feelings, and sensations without getting caught up in them.

    When you are mindful, you are able to observe your thoughts and emotions from a distance, without getting pulled into them. This allows you to respond to your experiences in a more balanced and considered way. Mindfulness can be helpful in managing stress, anxiety, and other mental health conditions. It can also improve your physical health by reducing blood pressure, improving sleep, and reducing inflammation.

    Mindfulness is something that anyone can practice, and it can have profound benefits for your health and wellbeing.

    If you’re struggling with addiction and mental health challenges, it’s important to seek help from a professional. AToN Center can provide you with the expert care and guidance you need to start feeling better. Our staff of professionals can recommend mindfulness exercises and other therapies to improve your physical and mental health.

    We’ll work with you to create a treatment plan that’s tailored to your unique needs, so that you can start on the road to recovery. Don’t suffer in silence – seek help today from AToN Center.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is one of the Non-12 Step treatments utilized by the highly credentialed staff at AToN Center. The term “cognitive” refers to one’s thoughts – meaning that CBT focuses on changing thoughts, which may decrease emotional distress. When emotional distress is decreased, behaviors can also be changed. This goal-oriented therapy focuses on teaching residents how to analyze their thought processes. It allows the resident to identify if these thoughts are helpful or distracting to recovery.

CBT draws awareness to automatic thoughts entrenched in one’s core beliefs. Core beliefs influence how one views the world and determine automatic thoughts triggered by daily life experiences. These thoughts and beliefs may be distorted, and residents work with the clinical team to enable the resident to work on strategies and skills – to develop more realistic, rational, and positive thoughts. CBT is a powerful and evidence-based tool for treating substance misuse disorders, as the American Psychological Association recommended.

At AToN Center, residents learn the common “cognitive distortions” and apply them to their unique circumstances. They also have assistance in identifying more rational and healthy ways of thinking about their experiences. Residents learn how to complete thought records, which are an essential tool in mastering CBT. Residents also learn other techniques that often provide relief, such as the double standard technique, thinking in shades of grey, survey, experimental, and others.

Together, the clinical team and resident create and train practical coping mechanisms and skills to use in real-time to prevent relapse. AToN Center combines CBT, Relapse Prevention, and Assertiveness Training to give our residents the optimal tools to set them up for success. Residents can practice these skills during weekly exposure sessions. Once the resident has been discharged from AToN Center, they can access the CBT skills they learned throughout their lifetime.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

 

Dialectical behavior therapy is a type of behavioral therapy that combines two opposing ideas or forces: acceptance and change. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) aims to help people learn how to accept themselves as they are. While also working to change the negative aspects of their lives. DBT has been shown to be effective in treating a variety of mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and substance abuse. The goal of DBT is to help people develop the skills they need to cope with difficult emotions and situations.

The four main goals of DBT are to reduce the frequency and intensity of therapeutic sessions; improve functioning in key areas of life; improve overall quality of life; and reduce suicide rates. DBT therapists use a variety of techniques to help people achieve these goals. These techniques include mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance.

DBT was first developed in the 1980s by Dr. Marsha Linehan. The goal of the therapy was to help people with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) better cope with their emotions and impulsive behaviors. However, DBT has since been shown to be an effective treatment for a variety of other conditions, including substance abuse and eating disorders.

The therapy is based on the principle that all humans have the ability to change and grow. This means that even when someone is feeling hopeless and helpless, they can still find ways to improve their situation. DBT aims to help people learn how to effectively regulate their emotions, control impulsive behaviors, and build healthier relationships with others. While it is not a cure-all, DBT has helped many people to improve their lives in a meaningful way.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

 

Substance use disorder (SUD) is a broad term that refers to a person’s inability to control their use of an illegal or legal drug or substance. An individual may initially start using drugs due to curiosity, to feel good, or relieve stress. However, over time, they may develop an addiction, defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite the harmful consequences. Individuals with an addiction often continue using drugs despite the negative impact on their health, relationships, and job.

In fact, addiction is considered a relapsing disease because it is often characterized by periods of remission and relapse. Although there is no cure for addiction, it is treatable. With evidence-based treatment, individuals can learn to manage their disorder and live healthy, productive lives.

Fortunately, there are effective treatments for SUD, including medication and therapy. One therapeutic approach for SUD that has been emerging over the past couple of decades is acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). ACT is a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy that focuses on helping people change their relationship to their thoughts and emotions. rather than trying to control or eliminate them.

The goal of ACT is to help people live in the present moment and make value-based choices, even in the face of difficult thoughts and emotions. Research has shown that ACT can be effective in treating SUD, as well as other mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression. If you or someone you know is struggling with SUD, consider seeking out a therapist who specializes in ACT.

EMDR Therapy

 

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapeutic intervention often utilized in trauma treatment. Specifically, EMDR assists residents in appropriately processing prior traumatic experiences that have continued lingering effects. Many individuals who abuse substances have had traumatic events occur that have not been processed, which may fuel their addiction. It is not uncommon for individuals to self-medicate to cope with the trauma. When someone has had an acute traumatic event, there is a negative impact on the person’s sense of self. Because of the disturbing nature of the experience, the brain’s information processing system has been interrupted, essentially creating an unprocessed memory that can emerge as if the trauma is happening again.

According to Dr. Francine Shapiro – the pioneer of EMDR: “The hypothesis is that the procedural elements of EMDR . . . trigger a physiological state that facilitates information processing.” This information processing is believed to facilitate an “adaptive resolution,” meaning that prior trauma has been appropriately processed and is no longer disturbing to the resident. Using EMDR therapy, the resident can address the traumatic experience(s) in a safe, therapeutic environment. By releasing the trauma, the resident can learn about the experience and move forward in their lives.

AToN has trained therapists with years of experience in treating trauma through EMDR. EMDR can be used with other modalities to help the resident with their trauma and co-occurring symptoms. Residents often report a great deal of relief even after just one EMDR session.

Trauma-informed Care

 

At AToN Center, ninety-eight percent of our residents are diagnosed with both a substance use diagnosis and some form of mental health diagnosis. The most common diagnoses comorbid with substance use at AToN are depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. As traumatic experiences are often related to these diagnoses, AToN has a vigorous trauma treatment program.

AToN Center has four full time psychologists who are at least EMDRIA Level 2 trained in Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR). Residents who are clinically appropriate and who desire to participate in EMDR will typically begin this therapy around the 10-14 day mark of their treatment. Depending on each case, a resident may participate in up to three ninety – minute EMDR sessions per week at AToN Center – however some residents may prefer less intensive treatment, and requests are certainly honored!

While some residents may not be clinically appropriate for EMDR, but desire this treatment, our clinicians will assist our residents in developing the coping strategies necessary to prepare for this intense therapy and refer our residents to continue this process on an outpatient basis. These coping strategies include biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy skills.

Mindfulness Practices

 

Mindfulness is a state of being present in the moment without judgment. It is about being aware of your thoughts, feelings, and sensations without getting caught up in them.

When you are mindful, you are able to observe your thoughts and emotions from a distance, without getting pulled into them. This allows you to respond to your experiences in a more balanced and considered way. Mindfulness can be helpful in managing stress, anxiety, and other mental health conditions. It can also improve your physical health by reducing blood pressure, improving sleep, and reducing inflammation.

Mindfulness is something that anyone can practice, and it can have profound benefits for your health and wellbeing.

If you’re struggling with addiction and mental health challenges, it’s important to seek help from a professional. AToN Center can provide you with the expert care and guidance you need to start feeling better. Our staff of professionals can recommend mindfulness exercises and other therapies to improve your physical and mental health.

We’ll work with you to create a treatment plan that’s tailored to your unique needs, so that you can start on the road to recovery. Don’t suffer in silence – seek help today from AToN Center.

Examples of Daily CBT / Psychology Groups led by our licensed psychologists:

Untwisting thoughts, thought records
Cognitive distortions
Managing emotions
Building motivation
Delay of gratification
Core beliefs
Assertive communication
Health in recovery
Grief and loss

Examples of Daily Recovery Study Groups led by our certified advanced chemical dependency counselors:

Relapse prevention
Cross addictions
Cycles of addiction/ stages of recovery
Spirituality in recovery
Managing cravings and triggers
Relationships in early recovery
Healing toxic shame
Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome
Goal Setting